Tag Archives: los angeles

Trapdoor social – The Move

Trapdoor Social is a Los Angeles based independent rock band with a mission. With its origins in a college environmental studies program, the band has a record of fundraising and activism to promote sustainability. Starting in 2015 Trapdoor Social branched off from the usual mix of club/radio/college shows and began producing outdoor, solar-powered concerts and events around the US, including Sunstock Solar Festival, which is takes place in Los Angeles annually. Their other projects combining music with activism have benefitted Homeboy IndustriesMesa Ridge High School, and Kids Cancer Connection.

The band’s music is energetic and passionate, with lyrics that play with love, philosophy, and social critique. Several of the band’s songs— “Away”, “Fine on My Own,” “Sunshine,” and “Wining as Truth” – have received significant airplay around the country, a national TV ad placement and success on Spotify’s ‘Discover Weekly’.
Trapdoor Social are set to release a full album, as well as a national tour in the spring of 2019.

The infectious track is inspired by the idea of a growing movement of people who want to leave the world better than they found it. With funk-fuelled guitars, impassioned vocals and a contagious chorus the single is sure to be stuck in your head all day long! The visuals feature protests for environmental regulation change.
The indie rock band have a record of fundraising and activism supporting sustainability, producing outdoor solar-powered concerts around the US.

Mayssa Karaa – Broken Lines

Mayssa Karaa with her captivating multi-octave voice and persuasive cross-cultural messages defines a new era of musical inclusion. Her songs tell of a journey connecting her origins in the ancient land of Lebanon to her adopted home of Los Angeles, California. She is about to launch her full-length English solo debut, Simple Cure.

Growing up in Lebanon, Mayssa Karaa was trained in classical music. While she loved singing, a future in civil engineering was her life plan. It was the sage advice of a French conductor that guided her to a professional music career. “He told me, ‘When you meet God he’s going to tell you, ‘I gave you a gift– what did you do with it?’ That was the turning point in my career. Fortunately, my dad had already applied to Berklee College of Music in Boston for me and had an audition set up.”

On Simple Cure, Mayssa Karaa says that most of her lyrics have their origins in conversations. “I would speak with my producer Richard Jacques, tell him something that I remembered, and we would come up with the lines and hooks to relate these stories.” When you put all the songs of the album together, you will understand the full story that lays behind.

The songs range from piano based simplicity to epic electronic orchestration. Among the highlights is “Simple Cure,” which speaks to finding peace through the miraculous power of inner strength, even in the chaos of a modern world. As Mayssa Karaa sings, “Step in the air, breathe in the stars, the simple cure is every heart.”

Cinema audiences might identify Mayssa Karaa’s voice from the hit film American Hustle, where her Arabic version of the ‘60s classic “White Rabbit” was a  standout track on the Grammy®-nominated soundtrack album. Television audiences might recognize her from the popular PBS Special, Enrico Caruso: His Life, His Cities, His Music, featuring Placido Domingo in Naples. (She is also featured in the follow-up that was released in the Spring of 2018.) International families might identify her with “The Arabic Alphabet Song” from Sesame Street that generated over 22 million YouTube views.

Melding Arabic influences into Western music is Mayssa’s forte: notable recordings in her catalog include a version of Pink Floyd’s “Comfortably Numb” accompanied by the band’s Scott Page, to which both Roger Waters and David Gilmour granted their blessings. Mayssa traveled to Detroit, Michigan to honor Rock & Roll Hall of Fame legend Bob Seger. Fronting a band organized by the distinguished producer Don Was, she performed a haunting version of Seger’s “Turn the Page” in both English and Arabic during the 22nd Annual “Concert Of Colors” in 2014 at the Orchestra Hall in Detroit, MI.

Mayssa Karaa
Mayssa Karaa with her captivating multi-octave voice and persuasive cross-cultural messages defines a new era of musical inclusion. Her songs tell of a journey connecting her origins in the ancient land of Lebanon to her adopted home of Los Angeles, California.

Grandson – Overdose

Grandson

Grandson is a 24 year old alternative artist hailing from Toronto, Canada. Born in New Jersey, he relocated to the cultural melting pot of Toronto at a young age, and grew up surrounded by music ranging from jazz to rock and roll to rap, dancehall and electronic. He began playing guitar and writing songs as a teenager, and experimented with hip hop and trap production.

Adopting the Grandson moniker while living in LA, he met guitarist and collaborator Kevin Hissink and dove deeply into rock influences such as Rage Against the Machine, Nirvana and Led Zeppelin, while also listening to rap and soul music emerging out of Toronto as well as alternative acts such as Twenty One Pilots and Hiatus Kaiyote. He found a small community of musicians to work and perform with in Los Angeles. The live set creates a frantic, mosh pit inducing cathartic release of energy for concert goers, influenced by early punk and grunge music.

Grandson’s lyrics confront the most pressing issues of his generation through his songwriting, such as governmental transparency, economic accountability, climate change and social justice, giving these topics a soundtrack with a genuine sense of urgency and frustration. The music also touches on adolescence, relationships, and the insecurities and difficulties of growing up.

Grandson
Grandson’s lyrics confront the most pressing issues of his generation through his songwriting, such as governmental transparency, economic accountability, climate change and social justice, giving these topics a soundtrack with a genuine sense of urgency and frustration. The music also touches on adolescence, relationships, and the insecurities and difficulties of growing up.